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General school information

Category: Elementary (PK-05) School
Phone: 540-786-4532
Address: 11108 Leavells Rd Fredericksburg, VA 22407
Principal: Mrs. Susan C. Fines
Superintendent: Dr. Stephen Scott Baker
Region: 3
Division: Spotsylvania County Public Schools
Division Website (opens new window)

Map results may not reflect school division or attendance zone boundaries.

Performance Snapshot

Accountability

Accountability

Assessments

Assessments

Enrollment

Enrollment

Finance

School Finance

Learning Climate

Learning Climate

Teacher Quality

Teacher Quality

State Accreditation Status

Fully Accredited

Title I Improvement Status

Not Applicable

Reward School Status


Accountability

State Accreditation Status

Fully Accredited

Elementary and middle schools are Fully Accredited if students achieve adjusted pass rates on state assessments of 75 percent or higher in English and 70 percent or higher in mathematics, science and history. High schools are Fully Accredited if students achieve adjusted pass rates of 75 percent or higher in English and 70 percent or higher in mathematics, science and history; and attain a point value of 85 or greater based on the Graduation and Completion Index.

State Accreditation Results

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Accreditation ratings are based on the achievement of students on statewide tests taken during the previous academic year, or on achievement during the three most recent academic years. In determining the accreditation rating of a school, adjustments are made to reward schools for the successful remediation of previously failing students. Allowances also are made for certain transfer students and certain English language learners. The benchmark adjusted pass rates for a school to be rated as Fully Accredited are as follows:

  • English 75 percent
  • Mathematics 70 percent
  • Science 70 percent
  • History/Social Science 70 percent

Ratings for high schools also reflect the success of efforts to increase completion and graduation. To be rated as Fully Accredited, a high school must have a Graduation and Completion Index of at least 85 percent. The Graduation and Completion Index awards full credit for students who earn diplomas, and partial credit for high school equivalencies.

In addition, effective with the 2016-2017 school year, schools that meet all requirements for full accreditation for three consecutive years are automatically rated as Fully Accredited for a fourth year.

State Accreditation Results
  2014-20152015-20162016-2017 
SubjectAccreditation Benchmark1 Year3 Year1 Year3 Year1 Year3 YearMet Accreditation Benchmark
English75817586798684YES
Mathematics70837785818685YES
History70869089888988YES
Science70808179807678YES
Graduation and Completion Index--------
LEGENDYes-C = Current year
Yes-3YR = Three-year average
Yes-4YR = Four-year average
IS = Improving school
AB = Approaching benchmark
W = Warned

Assessments

Student Achievement by Proficiency Level

Reading

Reading Performance: All Students

Virginia students are assessed annually in reading in grades 3-8 and once in high school with an end-of-course reading test. Use the drop down menu above the chart to view the results for a specific reading test. Use the menu below the chart to select assessment results for a specific group of students.

Virginia’s English Standards of Learning prepare students to participate in society as literate citizens, equipped with the ability to communicate effectively in their communities, in the workplace, and in postsecondary education. As students progress, they become active and involved listeners and develop a full command of the English language, evidenced by their use of standard English and their growing spoken and written vocabularies.

Recently retired SOL tests representative of the content and skills included in current SOL tests are available on the Virginia Department of Education website to assist in understanding the format of the tests and questions.

Overall Student Performance: Reading Performance2014-20152015-20162016-2017
Student SubgroupAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailed
All Students177760231582661815836817
Female207858221786691417856715
Male157762231478652212816919
Asian<100<0<100<0<<<<
Black767593357268289766724
Hispanic15715629117666249827418
White2383611722916892291699
Two or more races168064201774572610675733
Students with Disabilities55954412504850-545446
Economically Disadvantaged7686132672662812736127
English Learners865573556560357716429
Grade 3 English Reading Performance2014-20152015-20162016-2017
Student SubgroupAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailed
All Students15756025117463268797121
Female13816819980712011786722
Male16685232126958315807520
Asian<100<0<100<0
Black-595941-6868329746526
Hispanic167963213726928-838317
White197960212082621810827318
Two or more races<<<<<<<<13736027
Students with Disabilities-646436-333367-535347
Economically Disadvantaged561563946258387716329
English Learners207050307534747-757525
Grade 4 English Reading Performance2014-20152015-20162016-2017
Student SubgroupAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailed
All Students147359271883651716826718
Female127563252787601312867414
Male157156291079692119806120
Black-6161391071622912766524
Hispanic165640441580652011786722
White1985651523916892393707
Two or more races<<<<<<<<<<<<
Students with Disabilities8675833-535347-474753
Economically Disadvantaged4656035372692815695431
English Learners8463854-7575257645736
Grade 5 English Reading Performance2014-20152015-20162016-2017
Student SubgroupAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailed
All Students238461161889711121876613
Female3378452217917492992638
Male138976111987691313837017
Asian<100<0<100<0<<<<
Black2179582157773237787022
Hispanic137967211578632213877413
White2886581424987323598632
Two or more races<<<<<100<0<<<<
Students with Disabilities65044508675833-646436
Economically Disadvantaged137966211083731713796621
English Learners-797921669633113756325
LEGEND< = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Math

Math Performance: All Students

Virginia public school students assessed in mathematics in grades 3-8 and at the end of the following secondary mathematics courses: Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. Use the drop down menu above the chart to select a specific mathematics test. Use the menu below the chart to select assessment results for a specific group of students.

The content of the Standards of Learning for mathematics supports the following five goals for students: becoming mathematical problem solvers, communicating mathematically, reasoning mathematically, making mathematical connections, and using mathematical representations to model and interpret practical situations.

Throughout a student’s mathematics schooling from kindergarten through grade eight, specific content strands or topics are included. These content strands are Number and Number Sense; Computation and Estimation; Measurement; Geometry; Probability and Statistics; and Patterns, Functions, and Algebra. The Standards of Learning for each strand progress in complexity at each grade level and throughout the high school courses.

Recently retired SOL tests representative of the content and skills included in current SOL tests are available on the Virginia Department of Education website to assist in understanding the format of the tests and questions.

Overall Student Performance: Math Performance2014-20152015-20162016-2017
Student SubgroupAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailed
All Students237957212882541827845716
Female198263182984551629855615
Male267751232680542025835817
Asian<100<0<<<<<100<0
Black136955311769523112715929
Hispanic137764231887691323866314
White31845316418848123991539
Two or more races16766024965573519775823
Students with Disabilities849415173831624474353
Economically Disadvantaged107160291577622317735727
English Learners56863321378652216806420
Grade 3 Mathematics Performance2014-20152015-20162016-2017
Student SubgroupAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailed
All Students167660242178572216816519
Female128169192780532017816519
Male217251281776592415816619
Asian<100<0<100<0
Black1067573318644536-656535
Hispanic-8181191090791020907010
White257954213182511821876513
Two or more races20705030<<<<20806020
Students with Disabilities-363664-2727735524848
Economically Disadvantaged26764331272602812726028
English Learners-8282181387731321866414
Grade 4 Mathematics Performance2014-20152015-20162016-2017
Student SubgroupAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailed
All Students127159293683471729845516
Female127664244082421829835517
Male126755333384511629845516
Black46157392476522412766524
Hispanic86052403286551425866114
White188063205089391141894811
Two or more races<<<<<<<<<<<<
Students with Disabilities-3333677474053-383863
Economically Disadvantaged-6464361776592423704830
English Learners-3838621380672013736027
Grade 5 Mathematics Performance2014-20152015-20162016-2017
Student SubgroupAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailed
All Students388951112685591538885012
Female32885612238966114591479
Male449047103081521932855315
Asian<100<0<100<0<100<0
Black26785222968593223735027
Hispanic29926381585701522836117
White4792458419453658100420
Two or more races<<<<<<<<<<<<
Students with Disabilities19695031174225587504350
Economically Disadvantaged288153191783671716786222
English Learners148671141369563113816919
LEGEND< = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Science

Science Performance: All Students

Virginia public school students are assessed in science in grades 5 and 8 and at the end of the following secondary courses: Earth Science, Biology, and Chemistry. Before 2014, students also were assessed in science in grade 4. Use the drop down menu above the chart to select results for a specific science test. Use the menu below the chart to select assessment results for a specific group of students.

Virginia’s Science Standards of Learning identify academic content for essential components of the science curriculum at different grade levels. Standards are identified for kindergarten through grade five, for middle school, and for a core set of high school courses — Earth Science, Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. Throughout a student’s science schooling from kindergarten through grade six, content strands, or topics are included. The Standards of Learning in each strand progress in complexity as they are studied at various grade levels in grades K-6, and are represented indirectly throughout the high school courses.

Recently retired SOL tests representative of the content and skills included in current SOL tests are available on the Virginia Department of Education website to assist in understanding the format of the tests and questions.

Overall Student Performance: Science Performance2014-20152015-20162016-2017
Student SubgroupAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailed
All Students207757232578542223755225
Female207454262175552528805220
Male218059202881531919705130
Asian<100<0<100<0<<<<
Black13584642107162294464254
Hispanic147157291978592218826418
White25845916338451163793567
Two or more races<<<<<<<<<<<<
Students with Disabilities6474153-505050-363664
Economically Disadvantaged10655635157055308564744
English Learners-7171291969503113675333
Grade 5 Science Performance2014-20152015-20162016-2017
Student SubgroupAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailed
All Students207757232578542223755225
Female207454262175552528805220
Male218059202881531919705130
Asian<100<0<100<0<<<<
Black13584642107162294464254
Hispanic147157291978592218826418
White25845916338451163793567
Two or more races<<<<<<<<<<<<
Students with Disabilities6474153-505050-363664
Economically Disadvantaged10655635157055308564744
English Learners-7171291969503113675333
LEGEND< = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

History

History Performance: All Students

Virginia public school students are assessed in history and social science following instruction in Virginia Studies in elementary school, Civics and Economics in middle school, and at the conclusion of the following secondary courses: World History and Geography to 1500, World History and Geography 1500 to the Present, World Geography, and Virginia and U.S. History. Use the drop down menu above the chart to select a specific history or social science test. Use the menu below the chart to select assessment results for a specific group of students.

Virginia’s History and Social Science Standards of Learning are designed to

  • develop the knowledge and skills of history, geography, civics, and economics that enable students to place the people, ideas, and events that have shaped our state and our nation in perspective;
  • instill in students a thoughtful pride in the history of America through an understanding that what “We the People of the United States” launched more than two centuries ago was not a perfect union, but a continual effort to build a “more perfect” union, one which has become the world’s most successful example of constitutional self-government;
  • enable students to understand the basic values, principles, and operation of American constitutional democracy;
  • prepare students for informed, responsible, and participatory citizenship;
  • develop students’ skills in debate, discussion, and writing; and
  • provide students with a framework for continuing education in history and the social sciences.

Recently retired SOL tests representative of the content and skills included in current SOL tests are available on the Virginia Department of Education website to assist in understanding the format of the tests and questions.

Overall Student Performance: History Performance2014-20152015-20162016-2017
Student SubgroupAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailed
All Students268458164786391443884512
Female318352175184331643834017
Male22856315438845124392498
Black137563253390571024886512
Hispanic20886812487629243991529
White368953115586321457893211
Two or more races<<<<<100<0<<<<
Students with Disabilities771642974740538585042
Economically Disadvantaged188061203378452326775123
English Learners157762233177462330805020
VA Studies Performance2014-20152015-20162016-2017
Student SubgroupAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailedAdvancedPassedProficientFailed
All Students268458164786391443884512
Female318352175184331643834017
Male22856315438845124392498
Black137563253390571024886512
Hispanic20886812487629243991529
White368953115586321457893211
Two or more races<<<<<100<0<<<<
Students with Disabilities771642974740538585042
Economically Disadvantaged188061203378452326775123
English Learners157762233177462330805020
LEGEND< = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Number of recently arrived English language learners exempted from state reading assessments

2015-20162016-20172017-2018
State000
Division000
School000
Number of recently arrived English language learners exempted from state reading assessments

Enrollment

Fall Membership by Grade

Grade2015-20162016-20172017-2018
Pre-kindergarten544
Kindergarten99108110
Grade 187105114
Grade 213090109
Grade 311111494
Grade 410397113
Grade 511199102
Total Students646617646
Fall Membership by Grade
LEGEND< = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available

Fall Membership by Subgroup

2017 Fall Membership By Subgroup: Racial and Ethnic Groups

The Virginia Department of Education annually collects statistics on the number of students enrolled in public schools on September 30.  Student counts are reported by grade assignment, race, ethnicity, disability, English proficiency, and economic status.

The collection of race and ethnicity information as specified by the U.S. Department of Education is required for eligibility for federal education funds and for accountability reports.

A student is reported as economically disadvantaged if he or she meets any one of the following criteria:

  • Is eligible for Free/Reduced Meals;
  • Receives Temporary Assistance for Needy Families;
  • Is eligible for Medicaid; or
  • Is a migrant or is experiencing homelessness.

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Fall Membership by Subgroup
Subgroup2015-20162016-20172017-2018
All Students646617646
Female314302309
Male332315337
American Indian311
Asian8710
Black118121105
Hispanic152140162
Native Hawaiian122
White308286294
Two or more races566072
Students with Disabilities715964
Not Students with Disabilities575558582
Economically Disadvantaged228259297
Not Economically Disadvantaged418358349
English Learners747387
Not English Learners572544559
Homeless875
LEGEND< = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

School Finance

Percentage of Expenditures

Division Expenditures

Multiple factors should be considered when comparing the level of school division expenditures for instruction and expenditures for non-instructional costs, such as administration, health services and pupil transportation. These factors include economies of scale, geographic size, and the number of students requiring special services. For example:

  • Smaller school divisions may have similar administrative and support costs as larger divisions but these non-instructional costs are spread over a smaller expenditure base.
  • Geographically large but sparsely populated school divisions may have higher per-pupil transportation costs because of travel distances and mountainous topography.
  • Divisions with large populations of at-risk or special needs students must provide support services that are required or that raise student achievement.
School Division - Percentage of Expenditures
 2013-20142014-20152015-2016
Percentage of fiscal year division
operating expenditures for instructional costs
6666.865.9

Statewide Expenditures

The state Board of Education prescribes the following major classifications for expenditures of school funds: instruction; administration, attendance and health; pupil transportation; operation and maintenance; school food services and other non-instructional operations; facilities, debt and fund transfers; technology; and contingency reserves.

Instructional costs include the salaries and benefits paid to teachers, teacher aides, principals, assistant principals, librarians, and guidance counselors; expenditures for textbooks; and expenditures for students to participate in regional and virtual instructional programs.

School State - Percentage of Expenditures
 2013-20142014-20152015-2016
Percentage of fiscal year state
operating expenditures for instructional costs
66.867.166.9

Sources of Financial Support and Total Per Pupil Expenditures for Operations

Division Per-Pupil Spending

School divisions report annually on expenditures and appropriations to meet each locality’s required local effort in support of the Standards of Quality and local match requirements for incentive and lottery-funded programs. The amount by which school divisions exceed these required minimums varies based on local decisions and circumstances.

Most state support for public education is equalized to reflect each division’s capacity to support the required educational program. The Composite Index of Local Ability-to-Pay determines state and local shares of Standards of Quality costs for each division and local match requirements for incentive and lottery-funded programs. A portion of state sales tax revenues is distributed in support of public education based on school-age population estimates.

The federal government provides assistance to state and local education agencies in support of specific federal initiatives and mandates, such as instructional services for economically disadvantaged students and students with disabilities.

School Division - Per-Pupil Spending
 Local FundingStateFederal
2013-20144,389.005,023.00563.00
2014-20154,350.005,204.00596.00
2015-20164,816.005,149.00606.00

Statewide Per-Pupil Spending

The apportionment of the state funds for public education is the responsibility of the General Assembly, through the Appropriations Act. General fund appropriations serve as the mainstay of state support for the commonwealth’s public schools, augmented by retail sales and use tax revenues, state lottery proceeds, and other sources.

Counties, cities and towns comprising school divisions also support public education by providing the locality’s share to maintain an educational program meeting the commonwealth’s Standards of Quality and local match requirements for incentive and lottery-funded programs. .

While public education is primarily a state and local responsibility, the federal government provides assistance to state and local education agencies in support of specific federal initiatives and mandates.

 

State - Per-Pupil Spending
 Local FundingStateFederal
2013-20145,823.004,634.00784.00
2014-20155,950.004,802.00771.00
2015-20166,101.004,831.00812.00

Learning Climate

Percent of Students Absent

Percent of Students Absent 2016-2017 School Year:

Daily attendance is critical to success in school. A student is considered chronically absent if he or she misses two or more instructional days per month (18 days, or 10 percent of a 180-day school year) regardless of whether the absences are excused or unexcused. According to the U.S. Department of Education:

  • Children who are chronically absent in preschool, kindergarten, and first grade are much less likely to read on grade level by the third grade.
  • Students who can’t read at grade level by the third grade are four times more likely to drop out of high school.
  • By high school, regular attendance is a better dropout indicator than test scores.
  • A student who is chronically absent in any year between the eighth and twelfth grade is seven times more likely to drop out of school.
Absenteeism by Subgroup
2013-20142014-20152015-20162016-2017
Subgroup0%-10%10%-15%15%-20%20+%0%-10%10%-15%15%-20%20+%0%-10%10%-15%15%-20%20+%0%-10%10%-15%15%-20%20+%
All Students640211086514111861435111360641126
Female304565299232329721452991655
Male3361643352189531714783072571
American Indian0000000000000000
Asian141001100091000000
Black109202121820114523117822
Hispanic137311138534147622143812
Native Hawaiian0000000000000000
White3271385318215228519542712282
Two or more races51210607125742463310
Students with Disabilities70611706337074366731
Economically Disadvantaged2791376269217626916892642865
English Learners88200743018130081311
Homeless1431210122800213110
LEGEND< = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Attendance Rate

Attendance Rate: All Students

The attendance rate equals “average daily attendance” divided by “average daily membership.” Average daily attendance is the aggregate number of days of attendance of all students during a school year divided by the number of days school is in session during the year. Average daily membership is the aggregate number of days of membership of all students during a school year divided by the number of days school is in session during the year.

Attendance Rate
Subgroup2014-20152015-20162016-2017
All Students95.8895.8195.09
Female95.7795.7295.06
Male95.9795.995.12
American Indian95.291.74100
Asian96.4397.0994.32
Black96.4896.0995.45
Hispanic96.2395.9795.52
Native Hawaiian99.298.3595.77
White95.8395.6294.69
Two or more races94.195.7295.24
Students with Disabilities94.7994.5194.12
Economically Disadvantaged95.3395.3794.72
English Learners97.1896.3695.57
LEGEND< = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Standards of Accreditation (SOA) Offenses Data

2016-2017 Offenses
 Number of Offenses
Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Offenses<
Offenses Against Student<
Weapons Offenses<
All Other Offenses<
Other Offenses Against Persons<
Disorderly or Disruptive Behavior Offenses25
LEGEND< = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Short Term Suspensions

Short Term Suspensions:

Increasingly, Virginia schools are implementing Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, a nationally-recognized approach to support positive academic and behavioral outcomes for students. This positive approach to discipline prepares teachers and principals to implement new techniques that reduce disruptive student behaviors that lead to suspensions and decrease instructional time.

A short-term suspension (10 days of less) may be imposed by a principal, an assistant principal, or a designee teacher in the principal’s absence. The principal or assistant principal must tell the student of the charges against him or her. If the student denies them, he or she is given an explanation of the facts as known to the school and an opportunity to present his version of what occurred. Notice to the parent may be oral or written, depending on local school board policy, and must include information on the length of the suspension, the availability of community-based educational options, and the student’s right to return to regular school attendance when the suspension period has expired.  A parent may ask for a short-term suspension decision to be reviewed by the superintendent or his designee. Local school board policy will determine whether the superintendent’s decision is final or can be appealed to the local school board. For more information, see A Parent’s Guide To Understanding Student Discipline Policies and Practices In Virginia Schools.

Short Term Suspensions
 2014-20152015-20162016-2017
Subgroup% Population% Short Term Suspensions% Population% Short Term Suspensions% Population% Short Term Suspensions
American Indian0.3030.4640.162
Asian1.6691.2381.136
Black18.20917.6518.2665019.64338.89
Hispanic20.0347.0623.52922.727
Native Hawaiian0.1520.1550.325
White49.77235.2947.6785046.42961.11
Two or more races9.8638.6699.74
LEGEND< = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Long Term Suspensions

Long Term Supensions:

Increasingly, Virginia schools are implementing Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, a nationally-recognized approach to support positive academic and behavioral outcomes for students. This positive approach to discipline prepares teachers and principals to implement new techniques that reduce disruptive student behaviors that lead to suspensions and decrease instructional time.

A long-term suspension (more than 10 school days and less than 365 calendar days)  is usually imposed by a disciplinary hearing officer upon recommendation of a principal. The student must be told of the charges against him or her. If the student denies them, he or she is given an explanation of the facts as known to the school and an opportunity to present his or her version of what occurred. Notice to the parent (and child) must be in writing and must include information on the length of and reason for the suspension, the right to a hearing in accordance with local school board policy, the availability of community-based educational options, and the student’s right to return to regular school attendance when the suspension period has expired or to attend an appropriate alternative education program approved by the school board during the suspension or after the suspension period expires. Costs for any community-based educational programs or alternative programs that are not part of the program offered by the school division are the financial responsibility of the parent. A parent has the right to appeal a long-term suspension decision in accordance with local school board policy. The appeal may first go to the local superintendent or his or her designee or to a sub-committee of the local school board; final appeal is to the full school board. The appeal must be decided by the school board within 30 days. For more information, see A Parent’s Guide To Understanding Student Discipline Policies and Practices In Virginia Schools.

Long Term Suspensions
 2014-20152015-20162016-2017
Subgroup% Population% Long Term Suspensions% Population% Long Term Suspensions% Population% Long Term Suspensions
American Indian0.3030.4640.162
Asian1.6691.2381.136
Black18.20918.26619.643
Hispanic20.0323.52922.727
Native Hawaiian0.1520.1550.325
White49.77247.67810046.429
Two or more races9.8638.6699.74
LEGEND< = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Expulsions

Expulsions:

Increasingly, Virginia schools are implementing Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, a nationally-recognized approach to support positive academic and behavioral outcomes for students. This positive approach to discipline prepares teachers and principals to implement new techniques that reduce disruptive student behaviors that lead to suspensions and decrease instructional time.

An expulsion (removal from school for 365 calendar days) may only be imposed by a local school board. The student must be told of the charges against him or her. If the student denies them, he or she is given an explanation of the facts as known to the school and an opportunity to present his or her version of what occurred.  The parent (and child) must be noticed in writing of the proposed expulsion, the reasons the expulsion is being proposed, and of the right to a hearing before the school board or a sub-committee of the school board, depending on local policy. If the student is expelled, the parent is sent a written notification of the length of the expulsion and information on the availability of community-based educational, training, and intervention programs. The notice must state whether the student is eligible to return to regular school or to attend an approved alternative education program or an adult education program offered during or after the period of expulsion. The student may apply for readmission to be effective one calendar year from the date of his or her expulsion. For more information, see A Parent’s Guide To Understanding Student Discipline Policies and Practices In Virginia Schools.

Expulsions
 2014-20152015-20162016-2017
Subgroup% Population% Expulsions% Population% Expulsions% Population% Expulsions
American Indian0.3030.4640.162
Asian1.6691.2381.136
Black18.20918.26619.643
Hispanic20.0323.52922.727
Native Hawaiian0.1520.1550.325
White49.77247.67846.429
Two or more races9.8638.6699.74
LEGEND< = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Free and Reduced Meal Eligibility

Free and Reduced Meal Eligibility:

School divisions that choose to take part in the National School Lunch Program get cash subsidies and donated commodities from the U.S. Department of Agriculture for each meal they serve. In return, they must serve lunches that meet Federal requirements, and they must offer free or reduced-price lunches to eligible children. The School Breakfast Program operates by supporting breakfasts in the same manner as the National School Lunch Program.

 

At the beginning of each school year, letters and meal applications are distributed to households of children attending school. This letter informs households that school nutrition programs are available and that free and reduced-price meals are available based on income criteria. Applications have been eliminated totally in divisions that implement the community eligibility provision for all schools within the division.

Children from families with incomes at or below 130 percent of the poverty level are eligible for free meals. Those between 130 percent and 185 percent of the poverty level are eligible for reduced-price meals, for which students can be charged no more than 40 cents for lunch and 30 cents for breakfast. All other students pay the full price for meals.

See the Virginia Department of Education website for more information about school nutrition programs.

Free and Reduced Meal Eligibility
 2014-20152015-20162016-2017
 PercentagePercentagePercentage
All Students45.9145.9451.88
LEGEND< = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Free and Reduced Breakfast Participation of Eligible Students

Free and Reduced Breakfast Participation of Eligible Students :

The above pie graph displays the average daily percentage of students eligible for free or reduced-price meals who participated in the U.S. Department of Agriculture School Breakfast Program. The School Breakfast Program is a federally assisted meal program that provides nutritious breakfast meals to students. The Virginia Department of Education administers the program at the state level and school divisions administer the program at the local level.

Participation in the School Breakfast Program has been linked increased achievement, reduced absenteeism and tardiness, fewer disciplinary problems, and better student health.

Breakfast menus must provide one-fourth of the daily recommended levels for protein, calcium, iron, Vitamin A, Vitamin C and calories. Participating schools must serve breakfasts that meet Federal nutrition standards – one quarter of daily recommended levels of protein, calcium, iron, vitamins A and C and calories – and must provide free and reduced-price breakfasts to eligible children.

The No Kid Hungry Virginia campaign and the Virginia 365 Project are key state initiatives to increase participation in school nutrition programs and eliminate childhood hunger.

 

Free and Reduced Breakfast Participation
 2014-20152015-20162016-2017
 PercentagePercentagePercentage
All Students25.0825.8524.29
LEGEND< = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Free and Reduced Lunch Participation of Eligible Students

Free and Reduced Lunch Participation of Eligible Students:

The above pie graph displays the average daily percentage of students eligible for free or reduced-price meals who participated in the U.S. Department of Agriculture School Lunch Program.

School divisions that take part in the National School Lunch Program get cash subsidies and donated food items from the U.S. Department of Agriculture for each meal served. In return, schools must serve lunches that meet federal requirements, and must offer free or reduced-price lunches to eligible children.

Studies show that well-nourished students are better learners. The No Kid Hungry Virginia campaign and the Virginia 365 Project are key state initiatives to increase participation in school nutrition programs and eliminate childhood hunger.

 

Free and Reduced Lunch Participation
 2014-20152015-20162016-2017
 PercentagePercentagePercentage
All Students73.9371.7761.83
LEGEND< = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Teacher Quality

.

Provisionally Licensed Teachers

Provisionally Licensed Teachers
 2015-20162016-2017
Provisional Special Education3%3%
Provisional3%0%
LEGEND< = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available

This table reports the percentage of teachers teaching with provisional or provisional special education credentials.

Percentage of Core Academic Classes Taught by Teachers Not Meeting the Federal Definition of Highly Qualified

Percentage of Core Academic Classes Taught by Teachers Not Meeting the Federal Definition of Highly Qualified
 2014-20152015-20162016-2017
School
This school---
Division
All Schools100%1%1%
High Poverty---
Low Poverty100%1%1%
State
All Schools100%1%1%
High Poverty100%2%2%
Low Poverty100%1%1%
LEGEND< = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available

This table provides data on the percentage of classes not taught by teachers meeting the federal definition of highly qualified.

Federal education law defines a highly qualified teacher as a teacher who is fully licensed by the state, has at least a bachelor’s degree, has demonstrated competency in each subject taught, and is teaching in his or her area of endorsement.

Virginia’s licensure regulations – which emphasize content knowledge as well as pedagogy – require new teachers to far exceed the federal highly qualified standard.

Teacher Educational Attainment

Teacher Educational Attainment: 2016-2017

The Virginia Department of Education reports annually on the percentage of teachers with bachelor’s, master’s, or doctorate degrees in schools, school divisions, and the state by highest degree earned.

Teacher Educational Attainment
 Bachelor's DegreeMaster's DegreeDoctoral DegreeOther
2014-201556%44%0%0%
2015-201660%40%0%0%
2016-201763%38%0%-1%
LEGEND< = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
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