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Park View High

General school information

Category: High (09-12) School
Phone: 571-434-4500
Address: 400 W Laurel Ave Sterling, VA 20164
Principal: Kirk A Dolson
Superintendent: Dr. Eric Williams
Region: 4
Division: Loudoun County Public Schools
Division Website (opens new window)

Map results may not reflect school division or attendance zone boundaries.

Accreditation

Performance Snapshot

Assessments

Assessments

Enrollment

Enrollment

College & Career Readiness

College & Career Readiness

Finance

School Finance

Learning Climate

Learning Climate

Teacher Quality

Teacher Quality

ESSA

ESSA

State Accreditation Status

Accredited

Reward School Status


ACCREDITATION

Accreditation Status This Year: Accredited
Annual Waiver: 2018 through 2020

School Quality Indicators

Academic Achievement

English Level One
Mathematics Level One
Science Level One

Achievement Gaps

EnglishLevel One
MathematicsLevel Two

Student engagement & Outcomes

Chronic Absenteeism Level One
Dropout Rate Level Two
Graduation and Completion Level Two

Accredited: All indicators at Level One or Level Two or Waiver
Accredited With Conditions: One or more indicators at Level Three
Accreditation Denied: Under State Sanction

Achievement Gaps: English and Mathematics

Reporting on the achievement and progress of student groups allows schools to identify learners in need of additional support and resources.

Student Group Achievement Gap - English Achievement Gap - Math
Asian Level One Level One
Black Level One Level One
Economically Disadvantaged Level One Level One
English Learners Level One Level One
Hispanic Level One Level One
Students with Disabilities Level One Level Three
White Level One Level One

18.28% of the students in this school were chronically absent.

Assessments

Student Achievement by Proficiency Level

Reading

Reading Performance: All Students

Note: Calculations for 2017-2018 annual pass rates on Standards of Learning tests in reading, writing, mathematics, science and history were modified to reflect new federal reporting requirements.

Virginia students are assessed annually in reading in grades 3-8 and once in high school with an end-of-course reading test. Use the drop down menu above the chart to view the results for a specific reading test. Use the menu below the chart to select assessment results for a specific group of students.

Virginia’s English Standards of Learning prepare students to participate in society as literate citizens, equipped with the ability to communicate effectively in their communities, in the workplace, and in postsecondary education. As students progress, they become active and involved listeners and develop a full command of the English language, evidenced by their use of standard English and their growing spoken and written vocabularies.

Recently retired SOL tests representative of the content and skills included in current SOL tests are available on the Virginia Department of Education website to assist in understanding the format of the tests and questions.

Overall Student Performance: Reading Performance 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Student Subgroup Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed
All Students 4 83 79 17 5 82 76 18 4 77 72 23
Female 6 90 84 10 6 81 76 19 6 81 76 19
Male 3 77 74 23 5 82 77 18 3 73 70 27
American Indian < < < < < 100 < 0 < < < <
Asian 5 93 88 7 4 91 87 9 6 91 85 9
Black - 69 69 31 6 88 82 12 - 75 75 25
Hispanic 2 81 79 19 4 76 72 24 3 69 66 31
White 8 86 78 14 9 84 75 16 10 92 82 8
Two or more races < < < < < < < < 10 100 90 0
Students with Disabilities 10 48 39 52 10 40 30 60 7 67 59 33
Students without Disabilities 4 86 83 14 5 86 81 14 4 78 74 22
Economically Disadvantaged 3 78 75 22 3 79 76 21 3 73 70 27
Not Economically Disadvantaged 7 91 84 9 9 85 76 15 6 84 78 16
English Learners 1 63 62 37 1 65 64 35 1 53 51 47
EOC English Reading Performance 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Student Subgroup Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed
All Students 4 83 79 17 5 82 76 18 4 77 72 23
Female 6 90 84 10 6 81 76 19 6 81 76 19
Male 3 77 74 23 5 82 77 18 3 73 70 27
American Indian < < < < < 100 < 0 < < < <
Asian 5 93 88 7 4 91 87 9 6 91 85 9
Black - 67 67 33 6 88 82 12 - 75 75 25
Hispanic 2 81 79 19 4 76 72 24 3 69 66 31
White 8 86 78 14 9 84 75 16 10 92 82 8
Two or more races < < < < < < < < 10 100 90 0
Students with Disabilities 10 47 37 53 10 40 30 60 7 67 59 33
Students without Disabilities 4 86 83 14 5 86 81 14 4 78 74 22
Economically Disadvantaged 3 77 75 23 3 79 76 21 3 73 70 27
Not Economically Disadvantaged 7 91 84 9 9 85 76 15 6 84 78 16
English Learners 1 63 62 37 1 65 64 35 1 53 51 47
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Writing

Writing Performance: All Students

Note: Calculations for 2017-2018 annual pass rates on Standards of Learning tests in reading, writing, mathematics, science and history were modified to reflect new federal reporting requirements.

Virginia public school students assessed in writing in grade 8 and once in high school with an end-of-course writing test. Prior to 2014, students also took a writing test in grade 5. Use the drop down menu above the chart to select a specific writing test. Use the menu below the chart to select assessment results for a specific group of students.

Virginia’s English Standards of Learning prepare students to participate in society as literate citizens, equipped with the ability to communicate effectively in their communities, in the workplace, and in postsecondary education. As students progress, they become active and involved listeners and develop a full command of the English language, evidenced by their use of standard English and their growing spoken and written vocabularies.

Recently retired SOL tests representative of the content and skills included in current SOL tests are available on the Virginia Department of Education website to assist in understanding the format of the tests and questions.

Overall Student Performance: Writing Performance 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Student Subgroup Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed
All Students 15 73 58 27 19 81 62 19 18 76 58 24
Female 19 79 60 21 14 81 67 19 20 79 59 21
Male 12 68 56 32 23 81 58 19 16 73 57 27
American Indian < < < < < 100 < 0 < < < <
Asian 30 89 59 11 26 93 67 7 33 91 57 9
Black 7 80 73 20 11 74 63 26 8 92 83 8
Hispanic 8 63 55 37 11 77 66 23 11 68 57 32
White 20 85 65 15 35 85 50 15 41 90 49 10
Two or more races < < < < 50 92 42 8 - 90 90 10
Students with Disabilities 9 42 33 58 11 42 31 58 8 62 54 38
Students without Disabilities 16 77 61 23 20 86 66 14 19 77 58 23
Economically Disadvantaged 12 65 53 35 11 79 68 21 13 69 56 31
Not Economically Disadvantaged 21 85 65 15 31 85 54 15 28 88 60 12
English Learners 4 40 36 60 2 66 65 34 4 53 49 48
EOC Writing Performance 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Student Subgroup Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed
All Students 15 73 58 27 19 81 62 19 18 76 58 24
Female 19 79 60 21 14 81 67 19 20 79 59 21
Male 12 68 56 32 23 81 58 19 16 73 57 27
American Indian < < < < < 100 < 0 < < < <
Asian 30 89 59 11 26 93 67 7 33 91 57 9
Black 7 80 73 20 11 74 63 26 8 92 83 8
Hispanic 8 63 55 37 11 77 66 23 11 68 57 32
White 20 85 65 15 35 85 50 15 41 90 49 10
Two or more races < < < < 50 92 42 8 - 90 90 10
Students with Disabilities 9 42 33 58 11 42 31 58 8 62 54 38
Students without Disabilities 16 77 61 23 20 86 66 14 19 77 58 23
Economically Disadvantaged 12 65 53 35 11 79 68 21 13 69 56 31
Not Economically Disadvantaged 21 85 65 15 31 85 54 15 28 88 60 12
English Learners 4 40 36 60 2 66 65 34 4 53 49 48
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Math

Math Performance: All Students

Note: Calculations for 2017-2018 annual pass rates on Standards of Learning tests in reading, writing, mathematics, science and history were modified to reflect new federal reporting requirements.

Virginia public school students assessed in mathematics in grades 3-8 and at the end of the following secondary mathematics courses: Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. Use the drop down menu above the chart to select a specific mathematics test. Use the menu below the chart to select assessment results for a specific group of students.

The content of the Standards of Learning for mathematics supports the following five goals for students: becoming mathematical problem solvers, communicating mathematically, reasoning mathematically, making mathematical connections, and using mathematical representations to model and interpret practical situations.

Throughout a student’s mathematics schooling from kindergarten through grade eight, specific content strands or topics are included. These content strands are Number and Number Sense; Computation and Estimation; Measurement; Geometry; Probability and Statistics; and Patterns, Functions, and Algebra. The Standards of Learning for each strand progress in complexity at each grade level and throughout the high school courses.

Recently retired SOL tests representative of the content and skills included in current SOL tests are available on the Virginia Department of Education website to assist in understanding the format of the tests and questions.

Overall Student Performance: Math Performance 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Student Subgroup Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed
All Students 8 71 64 29 5 69 64 31 7 71 65 29
Female 6 75 70 25 6 76 70 24 8 74 66 26
Male 10 68 59 32 4 63 59 37 6 69 63 31
American Indian < < < < < < < < < < < <
Asian 21 92 72 8 11 87 76 13 20 89 69 11
Black - 68 68 32 6 65 59 35 8 68 61 32
Hispanic 4 65 61 35 3 62 59 38 3 65 61 35
White 15 80 65 20 8 84 76 16 9 84 75 16
Two or more races - 71 71 29 - 79 79 21 9 91 82 9
Students with Disabilities 4 38 34 62 - 57 57 43 6 52 46 48
Students without Disabilities 8 75 66 25 5 70 65 30 7 74 67 26
Economically Disadvantaged 4 68 63 32 4 64 61 36 4 67 63 33
Not Economically Disadvantaged 15 79 64 21 7 78 71 22 11 80 69 20
English Learners 3 55 52 45 2 54 52 46 2 58 55 42
Algebra I Performance 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Student Subgroup Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed
All Students - 58 58 42 - 60 60 40 - 58 58 42
Female - 66 66 34 - 70 70 30 - 60 60 40
Male - 53 53 47 - 53 53 47 - 56 56 44
American Indian < 100 < 0 < 100 < 0 < < < <
Asian - 92 92 8 - 82 82 18 - 80 80 20
Black < < < < - 58 58 42 - 42 42 58
Hispanic - 54 54 46 - 56 56 44 - 57 57 43
White - 68 68 32 - 79 79 21 - 55 55 45
Two or more races < < < < < < < < < 100 < 0
Students with Disabilities - 35 35 65 - 60 60 40 - 34 34 66
Students without Disabilities - 62 62 38 - 60 60 40 - 62 62 38
Economically Disadvantaged - 58 58 42 - 59 59 41 - 56 56 44
Not Economically Disadvantaged - 59 59 41 - 64 64 36 - 65 65 35
English Learners - 53 53 47 - 56 56 44 - 56 56 44
Geometry Performance 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Student Subgroup Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed
All Students 5 64 58 36 3 58 56 42 2 63 61 37
Female 3 69 66 31 4 63 60 37 3 65 62 35
Male 7 59 51 41 2 54 52 46 1 62 60 38
American Indian < < < < < < < < < < < <
Asian 15 85 71 15 7 84 78 16 8 79 71 21
Black - 57 57 43 5 50 45 50 - 71 71 29
Hispanic 3 59 57 41 2 49 47 51 1 57 56 43
White 11 70 59 30 2 75 73 25 3 74 71 26
Two or more races < < < < - 69 69 31 < < < <
Students with Disabilities - 28 28 72 - 39 39 61 - 48 48 52
Students without Disabilities 6 67 62 33 3 60 57 40 2 64 62 36
Economically Disadvantaged 4 60 56 40 2 52 50 48 1 60 59 40
Not Economically Disadvantaged 8 72 64 28 3 71 68 29 5 70 66 30
English Learners 3 44 41 56 1 41 41 59 1 47 46 53
Algebra II Performance 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Student Subgroup Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed
All Students 17 93 76 7 13 92 79 8 18 96 78 4
Female 14 93 79 7 12 94 82 6 19 98 79 2
Male 20 93 73 7 13 90 76 10 17 94 77 6
American Indian < 100 < 0 < 100 < 0 < 100 < 0
Asian 30 98 68 2 19 92 73 8 33 98 65 2
Black - 92 92 8 17 100 83 0 18 91 73 9
Hispanic 12 91 79 9 9 90 80 10 12 94 82 6
White 24 93 69 7 16 95 78 5 15 98 83 2
Two or more races - 90 90 10 < 100 < 0 20 100 80 0
Students with Disabilities < < < < - 83 83 17 - 85 85 15
Students without Disabilities 17 93 76 7 13 92 79 8 19 97 77 3
Economically Disadvantaged 10 93 83 7 11 90 79 10 16 96 81 4
Not Economically Disadvantaged 26 93 67 7 15 94 80 6 21 95 75 5
English Learners 10 88 79 12 10 82 72 18 8 90 82 10
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Science

Science Performance: All Students

Note: Calculations for 2017-2018 annual pass rates on Standards of Learning tests in reading, writing, mathematics, science and history were modified to reflect new federal reporting requirements.

Virginia public school students are assessed in science in grades 5 and 8 and at the end of the following secondary courses: Earth Science, Biology, and Chemistry. Before 2014, students also were assessed in science in grade 4. Use the drop down menu above the chart to select results for a specific science test. Use the menu below the chart to select assessment results for a specific group of students.

Virginia’s Science Standards of Learning identify academic content for essential components of the science curriculum at different grade levels. Standards are identified for kindergarten through grade five, for middle school, and for a core set of high school courses — Earth Science, Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. Throughout a student’s science schooling from kindergarten through grade six, content strands, or topics are included. The Standards of Learning in each strand progress in complexity as they are studied at various grade levels in grades K-6, and are represented indirectly throughout the high school courses.

Recently retired SOL tests representative of the content and skills included in current SOL tests are available on the Virginia Department of Education website to assist in understanding the format of the tests and questions.

Overall Student Performance: Science Performance 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Student Subgroup Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed
All Students 10 74 64 26 9 76 67 24 9 73 64 27
Female 8 76 69 24 8 77 69 23 8 75 67 25
Male 12 73 61 27 10 75 65 25 10 71 61 29
American Indian < < < < < 100 < 0 < < < <
Asian 23 89 66 11 16 87 71 13 21 95 74 5
Black 3 81 78 19 7 81 74 19 8 76 69 24
Hispanic 4 67 63 33 4 68 64 32 4 63 59 37
Native Hawaiian < 100 < 0 < 100 < 0 < 100 < 0
White 20 83 63 17 22 90 68 10 20 89 69 11
Two or more races 19 89 70 11 18 100 82 0 8 92 84 8
Students with Disabilities 5 48 44 52 3 58 55 42 5 48 43 52
Students without Disabilities 10 77 66 23 10 78 68 22 10 76 66 24
Economically Disadvantaged 5 71 66 29 5 70 64 30 5 66 60 34
Not Economically Disadvantaged 20 81 61 19 15 87 71 13 16 85 70 15
English Learners 2 54 53 46 2 55 53 45 2 50 48 50
Biology Performance 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Student Subgroup Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed
All Students 8 66 59 34 9 75 66 25 11 76 65 24
Female 6 69 64 31 7 80 72 20 8 80 72 20
Male 9 64 55 36 10 72 62 28 13 73 59 27
American Indian < < < < < 100 < 0 < < < <
Asian 22 84 62 16 17 89 72 11 27 98 71 2
Black - 86 86 14 - 70 70 30 7 67 59 33
Hispanic 4 59 55 41 2 67 65 33 5 67 62 33
Native Hawaiian < 100 < 0
White 13 76 64 24 29 90 62 10 28 96 68 4
Two or more races 15 77 62 23 10 100 90 0 - 100 100 0
Students with Disabilities - 27 27 73 - 52 52 48 - 42 42 58
Students without Disabilities 9 71 62 30 10 78 68 22 13 81 68 19
Economically Disadvantaged 4 62 58 38 3 67 64 33 7 71 63 29
Not Economically Disadvantaged 16 76 60 24 20 89 70 11 18 86 68 14
English Learners 1 44 43 56 - 51 51 49 3 55 52 45
Chemistry Performance 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Student Subgroup Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed
All Students 8 80 72 20 9 83 74 17 11 81 70 19
Female 6 81 75 19 7 76 70 24 10 80 70 20
Male 10 79 69 21 11 90 79 10 12 81 69 19
Asian 19 84 65 16 14 81 67 19 21 96 75 4
Black < < < < 6 88 81 13 < 100 < 0
Hispanic 4 74 71 26 4 80 77 20 4 70 66 30
White 8 86 78 14 16 88 71 13 17 85 67 15
Two or more races < 100 < 0 < 100 < 0 < 100 < 0
Students with Disabilities < < < < < < < < - 75 75 25
Students without Disabilities 8 81 72 19 9 85 75 15 11 81 70 19
Economically Disadvantaged 8 79 71 21 8 82 74 18 5 77 72 23
Not Economically Disadvantaged 9 81 73 19 11 86 75 14 17 84 68 16
English Learners 7 72 66 28 2 67 66 33 2 63 61 37
Earth Science Performance 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Student Subgroup Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed
All Students 14 81 68 19 8 71 63 29 5 65 60 35
Female 11 83 72 17 8 75 67 25 5 67 62 33
Male 16 80 65 20 8 68 60 32 4 63 58 37
American Indian < 100 < 0 < 100 < 0 < 100 < 0
Asian 27 98 71 2 14 90 76 10 13 90 78 10
Black 9 73 64 27 6 81 74 19 6 88 82 12
Hispanic 4 75 71 25 5 63 58 37 2 55 53 45
White 45 91 47 9 21 92 71 8 12 85 73 15
Two or more races < 100 < 0 < 100 < 0 18 82 64 18
Students with Disabilities 7 68 61 32 - 59 59 41 - 43 43 57
Students without Disabilities 15 84 69 16 10 73 64 27 5 68 62 32
Economically Disadvantaged 4 78 74 22 5 65 60 35 2 56 53 44
Not Economically Disadvantaged 34 89 55 11 16 85 70 15 11 86 75 14
English Learners 1 64 63 36 2 53 51 47 - 41 41 59
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

History

History Performance: All Students

Note: Calculations for 2017-2018 annual pass rates on Standards of Learning tests in reading, writing, mathematics, science and history were modified to reflect new federal reporting requirements.

Virginia public school students are assessed in history and social science following instruction in Virginia Studies in elementary school, Civics and Economics in middle school, and at the conclusion of the following secondary courses: World History and Geography to 1500, World History and Geography 1500 to the Present, World Geography, and Virginia and U.S. History. Use the drop down menu above the chart to select a specific history or social science test. Use the menu below the chart to select assessment results for a specific group of students.

Virginia’s History and Social Science Standards of Learning are designed to

  • develop the knowledge and skills of history, geography, civics, and economics that enable students to place the people, ideas, and events that have shaped our state and our nation in perspective;
  • instill in students a thoughtful pride in the history of America through an understanding that what “We the People of the United States” launched more than two centuries ago was not a perfect union, but a continual effort to build a “more perfect” union, one which has become the world’s most successful example of constitutional self-government;
  • enable students to understand the basic values, principles, and operation of American constitutional democracy;
  • prepare students for informed, responsible, and participatory citizenship;
  • develop students’ skills in debate, discussion, and writing; and
  • provide students with a framework for continuing education in history and the social sciences.

Recently retired SOL tests representative of the content and skills included in current SOL tests are available on the Virginia Department of Education website to assist in understanding the format of the tests and questions.

Overall Student Performance: History Performance 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Student Subgroup Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed
All Students 12 72 60 28 12 72 61 28 11 76 65 24
Female 10 70 60 30 11 73 62 27 11 76 65 24
Male 14 73 59 27 12 72 59 28 11 76 64 24
American Indian < < < < - 80 80 20 < < < <
Asian 23 92 70 8 25 91 66 9 21 94 72 6
Black 9 67 59 33 6 75 68 25 11 68 57 32
Hispanic 6 62 56 38 5 63 58 37 6 67 61 33
Native Hawaiian < 100 < 0 < 100 < 0 < 100 < 0
White 25 85 60 15 25 88 63 12 21 91 70 9
Two or more races 10 83 72 17 21 93 71 7 15 100 85 0
Students with Disabilities 4 46 42 54 4 51 48 49 2 43 41 57
Students without Disabilities 13 74 61 26 12 75 62 25 12 81 68 19
Economically Disadvantaged 7 66 59 34 8 66 58 34 7 69 61 31
Not Economically Disadvantaged 21 82 61 18 18 83 65 17 17 88 71 12
English Learners 2 47 45 53 2 49 48 51 3 52 49 48
VA & US History Performance 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Student Subgroup Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed
All Students 8 71 63 29 8 64 56 36 7 78 71 22
Female 9 69 60 31 6 61 55 39 6 76 70 24
Male 8 73 66 27 10 67 57 33 8 79 71 21
American Indian < < < < < < < < < 100 < 0
Asian 11 92 81 8 17 85 67 15 12 92 81 8
Black 8 62 54 38 11 84 74 16 7 71 64 29
Hispanic 5 61 56 39 3 54 50 46 4 69 66 31
White 15 85 69 15 17 79 62 21 16 90 75 10
Two or more races < < < < < < < < 8 100 92 0
Students with Disabilities - 58 58 42 3 38 34 62 3 54 51 46
Students without Disabilities 9 73 64 27 9 67 58 33 7 80 73 20
Economically Disadvantaged 6 66 60 34 4 59 55 41 4 72 68 28
Not Economically Disadvantaged 12 81 69 19 16 75 58 25 12 87 75 13
English Learners - 45 45 55 1 40 39 60 2 53 52 47
World History I Performance 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Student Subgroup Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed
All Students 14 74 60 26 11 79 69 21 14 75 61 25
Female 13 73 60 27 11 83 72 17 15 77 62 23
Male 15 75 59 25 11 76 65 24 12 73 61 27
American Indian < 100 < 0 < 100 < 0 < < < <
Asian 37 96 59 4 22 96 75 4 31 98 67 2
Black 8 75 67 25 4 78 74 22 13 87 73 13
Hispanic 5 62 58 38 5 70 65 30 8 64 56 36
White 30 92 62 8 25 96 71 4 23 95 72 5
Two or more races < 100 < 0 < 100 < 0 17 100 83 0
Students with Disabilities 8 58 50 42 - 55 55 45 2 49 47 51
Students without Disabilities 15 76 61 24 12 84 71 16 16 79 64 21
Economically Disadvantaged 7 67 60 33 9 74 65 26 9 66 57 35
Not Economically Disadvantaged 28 86 59 14 14 89 75 11 22 93 70 7
English Learners 4 46 42 54 3 59 56 41 3 52 49 48
World History II Performance 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Student Subgroup Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed
All Students 16 72 57 28 18 80 62 20 13 75 62 25
Female 10 72 62 28 17 78 61 22 11 75 64 25
Male 20 73 53 27 19 82 62 18 16 75 60 25
American Indian < 100 < 0 < < < < < 100 < 0
Asian 26 91 65 9 35 92 58 8 24 92 69 8
Black 10 65 55 35 - 60 60 40 9 55 45 45
Hispanic 9 67 57 33 10 74 64 26 7 67 60 33
Native Hawaiian < 100 < 0 < 100 < 0
White 33 77 44 23 34 91 57 9 25 88 63 13
Two or more races 20 90 70 10 20 90 70 10 < 100 < 0
Students with Disabilities 3 23 19 77 - 52 52 48 - 23 23 78
Students without Disabilities 17 77 61 23 20 83 63 17 15 83 68 17
Economically Disadvantaged 10 69 58 31 13 74 61 26 10 69 59 31
Not Economically Disadvantaged 26 80 54 20 26 89 64 11 19 85 66 15
English Learners 4 52 48 48 1 56 55 44 3 48 45 52
Geography Performance 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Student Subgroup Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed Advanced Passed Proficient Failed
All Students - 54 54 46 - 42 42 58 - 65 65 35
Female - 41 41 59 - 44 44 56 - 70 70 30
Male - 61 61 39 - 40 40 60 < < < <
American Indian < < < <
Asian < < < < < < < < < 100 < 0
Black < 100 < 0 < < < <
Hispanic - 39 39 61 - 43 43 57 - 60 60 40
White < 100 < 0 < < < < < 100 < 0
Two or more races < < < <
Students with Disabilities < < < < < < < <
Students without Disabilities - 57 57 43 - 42 42 58 - 69 69 31
Economically Disadvantaged - 51 51 49 - 43 43 57 - 60 60 40
Not Economically Disadvantaged - 64 64 36 < < < < < 100 < 0
English Learners - 41 41 59 - 42 42 58 - 54 54 46
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Number of recently arrived English language learners exempted from state reading assessments

2015-20162016-20172017-2018
State3,4624,2272,762
Division282323211
School000
Number of recently arrived English language learners exempted from state reading assessments

Enrollment

Fall Membership by Grade

Grade 2016-20172017-20182018-2019
Grade 9401350312
Grade 10370409345
Grade 11445377386
Grade 12333383347
Post Graduate620
Total Students1,5551,5211,390
Fall Membership by Grade
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available

Fall Membership by Subgroups

2018 Fall Membership By Subgroup: Racial and Ethnic Groups

The Virginia Department of Education annually collects statistics on the number of students enrolled in public schools on September 30.  Student counts are reported by grade assignment, race, ethnicity, disability, English proficiency, and economic status.

The collection of race and ethnicity information as specified by the U.S. Department of Education is required for eligibility for federal education funds and for accountability reports.

A student is reported as economically disadvantaged if he or she meets any one of the following criteria:

  • Is eligible for Free/Reduced Meals;
  • Receives Temporary Assistance for Needy Families;
  • Is eligible for Medicaid; or
  • Is a migrant or is experiencing homelessness.

.

Fall Membership by Subgroup
Subgroup 2016-20172017-20182018-2019
All Students155515211390
Female695697665
Male860824725
American Indian161310
Asian203200181
Black807870
Hispanic962974901
Native Hawaiian121
White254211188
Two or more races394339
Students with Disabilities179194186
Students without Disabilities137613271204
Economically Disadvantaged10801054953
Not Economically Disadvantaged475467437
English Learners712665544
Not English Learners843856846
Homeless117104129
Foster Care123
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

College & Career Readiness

Diplomas and Completion

Class of 2018: All Students

School

Division

State

Most Virginia students earn either an Advanced Studies Diploma or a Standard Diploma.

To graduate with an Advanced Studies Diploma, a student must earn at least 26 standard units of credit by passing required courses and electives and at least nine verified units of credit by passing Standards of Learning end-of-course assessments in English, mathematics, science and history. Students who entered the ninth grade in 2013-2014 and afterwards must also successfully complete one virtual course.

To graduate with a Standard Diploma, a student must earn at least 22 standard units of credit by passing required courses and electives, and earn at least six verified credits by passing end-of-course SOL tests or other assessments approved by the Board of Education. Students who entered the ninth grade in 2013-2014 and afterwards must also earn a board-approved career and technical education credential to graduate and successfully complete one virtual course.

The Applied Studies Diploma and Modified Standard Diploma are available for certain students with disabilities. To reduce the likelihood of school-level pie charts being suppressed to protect student privacy, these diplomas are combined with Standard Diplomas in the pie chart as “Standard and Other Diplomas.”

 

 

 

Status of the Students in the 2017-2018 Cohort
Student Subgroup School Advanced Diplomas Standard Diplomas Other Diplomas GED's Dropouts Other Non-Graduates
All Students School 159 172 17 1 53 7
Division 4241 1290 78 34 193 38
State 50983 36022 2734 1046 5399 1777
Female School 71 76 5 1 18 3
Division 2191 554 27 17 67 17
State 27838 15824 920 366 1921 654
Male School 88 96 12 0 35 4
Division 2050 736 51 17 126 21
State 23145 20198 1814 680 3478 1123
American Indian School < < < < 0 <
Division 11 9 0 0 1 0
State 144 124 9 2 27 8
Asian School 28 16 1 0 0 0
Division 804 115 9 2 6 4
State 5026 1195 70 18 91 37
Black School 11 6 1 0 1 1
Division 253 170 7 4 5 4
State 7955 11092 1113 243 1359 742
Hispanic School 77 121 12 0 49 6
Division 467 381 23 7 148 17
State 5086 5584 317 105 2171 325
Native Hawaiian School < < < < 0 <
Division < < < < 0 <
State 82 60 1 2 3 4
White School 35 21 3 1 3 0
Division 2505 544 38 17 32 12
State 30222 16424 1138 618 1586 589
Two or more races School 6 4 0 0 0 0
Division 199 68 1 4 1 1
State 2468 1543 86 58 162 72
Students with Disabilities School 0 20 17 0 3 1
Division 163 315 78 6 22 5
State 1056 6507 2734 137 1105 108
Economically Disadvantaged School 89 119 11 1 27 5
Division 436 447 33 10 104 19
State 10704 17348 1682 460 2637 1090
English Learners School 26 100 8 0 50 5
Division 126 287 20 3 144 13
State 1418 3759 272 31 1845 117
Homeless School 3 22 1 0 20 0
Division 34 85 6 4 54 4
State 232 695 90 42 302 61
Foster Care School < < < < < <
Division < < < < < <
State 35 175 31 10 56 15
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available

Four-Year Virginia On-Time Graduation Rate

On-Time Graduation Rate Over Time: All Students

The Virginia On-Time Graduation Rate is based on four years of longitudinal student-level data and accounts for student mobility, changes in student enrollment, and local decisions on the promotion and retention of students. The formula also recognizes that some students with disabilities and English learners are allowed more than the standard four years to earn a diploma and are still counted as “on-time” graduates.

Graduates are defined as students who earn an Advanced Studies Diploma, Standard Diploma, Modified Standard Diploma, or Applied Studies Diploma. On-time graduates are students who earn one of these diplomas within four years of entering the ninth grade. Special education students and English learners who have plans in place that allow them more time to graduate are counted as on-time graduates or as non-graduates when they earn a diploma or otherwise exit high school.

Status of Students After Four Years of High School
Students Subgroup Students in Cohort Graduates On-Time Graduation Rate Completers Completion Rate Cohort Dropouts Cohort Dropout Rate
All Students40934885.1356875313
Female17415287.415689.71810.3
Male23519683.420085.13514.9
American Indian0<100<10000
Asian45451004510000
Black201890199515
Hispanic26521079.221681.54918.5
Native Hawaiian0<100<10000
White635993.76095.234.8
Two or more races10101001010000
Students with Disabilities413790.23892.737.3
Economically Disadvantaged25221986.922589.32710.7
English Learners18913470.913973.55026.5
Homeless462656.52656.52043.5
Foster Care0<<<<<<
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Gap Group 1 = Students with Disabilities, English Language Learners, Economically Disadvantaged Students (unduplicated)
Gap Group 2 = Black Students
Gap Group 3 = Hispanic Students
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Advanced Program Information: Number and Percentage of Students Enrolled in Advanced Programs

Advanced Program Information
Count/Percentage
Program Type 2015-20162016-20172017-2018
Advanced Placement Test Taken255 / 17.81%273 / 17.62%307 / 20.22%
Advanced Placement Course Enrollment313 / 21.86%323 / 20.85%327 / 21.54%
Dual Enrollment26 / 1.82%53 / 3.42%70 / 4.61%
Governor's School Enrollment - - -
IB Course Enrollment - - -
Senior Enrolled in IB Program - - -
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available

Postsecondary Enrollment

2015-2016 Postsecondary Enrollment: All Students

Postsecondary enrollment reports show the number and percent of Virginia high school graduates who enrolled in an institution of higher education within sixteen months of graduating from high school. In keeping with federal reporting requirements, postsecondary enrollment reports only include students who earned an Advanced Studies Diploma, International Baccalaureate Diploma or Standard Diploma; students who earned other Virginia Board of Education-approved diplomas are not counted as graduates in the calculation. Reports are available at the state, division and school levels for all students and for student subgroups.

The data represent the best available estimates at this time of postsecondary enrollment. There is currently no definitive source of all postsecondary enrollment records by state, division or school. Virginia Department of Education and external researchers have determined that the best available estimates contained in the postsecondary enrollment reports are likely underestimates, but capture at least 88 percent of Virginia public high school graduates’ postsecondary enrollments.

2015-2016 FGI cohort year (students entering high school in 2012)
Total number of students in the cohort earning a federally recognized high school diploma Students who enrolled in any Institution of Higher Education (IHE) within 16 months of earning a federally recognized high school diploma
Type Total Total HE Remaining Percent
All Students School 234 170 27
Division 4763 4040 15
State 82483 57560 30
Female School 132 102 23
Division 2340 2052 12
State 41546 31230 25
Male School 102 68 33
Division 2423 1988 18
State 40937 26330 36
American Indian School 0 < 100
Division 12 < 100
State 220 132 40
Asian School 41 36 12
Division 681 607 11
State 5492 4724 14
Black School 23 17 26
Division 376 301 20
State 18272 11640 36
Hispanic School 106 69 35
Division 631 472 25
State 8548 5341 38
White School 56 41 27
Division 2857 2473 13
State 46319 33154 28
Two or more races School 0 < 100
Division 198 174 12
State 3521 2499 29
Students with Disabilities School 15 < 100
Division 388 269 31
State 5986 3008 50
Economically Disadvantaged School 110 80 27
Division 639 450 30
State 23516 13119 44
English Learners School 62 37 40
Division 295 208 29
State 5120 3136 39
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results.
- = no data available for that group
* = Data not yet available
This report provides the best available estimates about college enrollment according to the National Student Clearinghouse.
For more information, see the answers to Frequently Asked Questions about this report at: http://www.doe.virginia.gov/school_finance/arra/stabilization/reported_data/assurance_c/faq_c11.pdf
Students who attended schools that do not participate in NSC are not included in the number or percent of students enrolled in an IHE.
Federally recognized high school diplomas include Standard, Advanced Studies, or International Baccalaureate (IB) diplomas. Most subgroups are based on students' most recent status.

Career & Technical Education

Students Earning One or More CTE Credentials: All Students

Virginia’s 16 career clusters help students investigate careers and design a rigorous and relevant plan of study to advance their career goals. Each career cluster contains multiple pathways that represent a common set of academic, technical and work-place skills. Career pathways lead to credentials that qualify students for a range of career opportunities from entry to professional level. A credential is defined as:

  • State-Issued Professional License, required for entry into a specific occupation as determined by a Virginia state licensing agency;
  • Full Industry Certification, from a recognized industry, trade, or professional association validating essential skills of a particular occupation;
  • Pathway Industry Certification, which may consist of entry-level exams as a component of a suite of exams in an industry certification program leading toward full certification; or
  • Occupational competency assessment, a national standardized assessment of skills/knowledge in a specific career and/or technical area, (NOCTI).

Virginia defines a CTE completer as a student who has met the requirements for a career and technical concentration and all requirements for high school graduation or an approved alternative education program.

Career and Technical Education
Count
2015-20162016-20172017-2018
Industry CertificationSchool361385377
 Division497358406115
 State99894109275104601
Workplace ReadinessSchool2223200
 Division3586316763
 State307754231350241
Total Credentials EarnedSchool383408577
 Division5349649112889
 State137248157490160248
Students Earning One or More CredentialsSchool349340504
 Division4818543210616
 State109089126113128672
CTE CompletersSchool677687
 Division171017541882
 State424044051641438
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available

Advanced Placement Participation and Achievement

AP Achievement
2013-2014
Number of Test Takers Number of Tests Taken Number of Tests with Qualifying Scores Percentage of Tests Passed
All Students 298 515 266 51.7%
2014-2015
Number of Test Takers Number of Tests Taken Number of Tests with Qualifying Scores Percentage of Tests Passed
All Students 299 553 271 49%
2015-2016
Number of Test Takers Number of Tests Taken Number of Tests with Qualifying Scores Percentage of Tests Passed
All Students 255 455 251 55.2%
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available

School Finance

Percentage of Expenditures

Division Expenditures

Multiple factors should be considered when comparing the level of school division expenditures for instruction and expenditures for non-instructional costs, such as administration, health services and pupil transportation. These factors include economies of scale, geographic size, and the number of students requiring special services. For example:

  • Smaller school divisions may have similar administrative and support costs as larger divisions but these non-instructional costs are spread over a smaller expenditure base.
  • Geographically large but sparsely populated school divisions may have higher per-pupil transportation costs because of travel distances and mountainous topography.
  • Divisions with large populations of at-risk or special needs students must provide support services that are required or that raise student achievement.
School Division - Percentage of Expenditures
  2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Percentage of fiscal year division
operating expenditures for instructional costs
68.2 67.4 68

Statewide Expenditures

The state Board of Education prescribes the following major classifications for expenditures of school funds: instruction; administration, attendance and health; pupil transportation; operation and maintenance; school food services and other non-instructional operations; facilities, debt and fund transfers; technology; and contingency reserves.

Instructional costs include the salaries and benefits paid to teachers, teacher aides, principals, assistant principals, librarians, and guidance counselors; expenditures for textbooks; and expenditures for students to participate in regional and virtual instructional programs.

School State - Percentage of Expenditures
  2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
Percentage of fiscal year state
operating expenditures for instructional costs
67.1 66.9 67.2

Sources of Financial Support and Total Per Pupil Expenditures for Operations

Division Per-Pupil Spending

School divisions report annually on expenditures and appropriations to meet each locality’s required local effort in support of the Standards of Quality and local match requirements for incentive and lottery-funded programs. The amount by which school divisions exceed these required minimums varies based on local decisions and circumstances.

School Quality Profiles for the 2018-2019 school year will include additional information about per-pupil expenditures for the commonwealth, school divisions and schools. VDOE is working with school divisions to gather this information as required under the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015.

Most state support for public education is equalized to reflect each division’s capacity to support the required educational program. The Composite Index of Local Ability-to-Pay determines state and local shares of Standards of Quality costs for each division and local match requirements for incentive and lottery-funded programs. A portion of state sales tax revenues is distributed in support of public education based on school-age population estimates.

The federal government provides assistance to state and local education agencies in support of specific federal initiatives and mandates, such as instructional services for economically disadvantaged students and students with disabilities.

School Division - Per-Pupil Spending
  Local Funding State Federal
2014-20158,817.003,805.00292.00
2015-20169,437.003,832.00280.00
2016-20179,914.004,101.00302.00

Statewide Per-Pupil Spending

The apportionment of the state funds for public education is the responsibility of the General Assembly, through the Appropriations Act. General fund appropriations serve as the mainstay of state support for the commonwealth’s public schools, augmented by retail sales and use tax revenues, state lottery proceeds, and other sources.

Counties, cities and towns comprising school divisions also support public education by providing the locality’s share to maintain an educational program meeting the commonwealth’s Standards of Quality and local match requirements for incentive and lottery-funded programs. .

While public education is primarily a state and local responsibility, the federal government provides assistance to state and local education agencies in support of specific federal initiatives and mandates.

School Quality Profiles for the 2018-2019 school year will include additional information about per-pupil expenditures for the commonwealth, school divisions and schools. VDOE is working with school divisions to gather this information as required under the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015.

State - Per-Pupil Spending
  Local Funding State Federal
2014-20155,950.004,802.00771.00
2015-20166,101.004,831.00812.00
2016-20176,268.005,033.00871.00

Learning Climate

Chronic Absenteeism

Chronic Absenteeism 2017-2018 School Year:

Daily attendance is critical to success in school. A student is considered chronically absent if he or she is absent for 10 percent or more of the school year, regardless of whether the absences are excused or unexcused. According to the U.S. Department of Education:

  • Children who are chronically absent in preschool, kindergarten, and first grade are much less likely to read on grade level by the third grade.
  • Students who can’t read at grade level by the third grade are four times more likely to drop out of high school.
  • By high school, regular attendance is a better dropout indicator than test scores.
  • A student who is chronically absent in any year between the eighth and twelfth grade is seven times more likely to drop out of school.

The calculation for chronic absenteeism only includes students enrolled for at least half of the school year.

Absenteeism by Subgroup
2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Subgroup Below 10% 10% or Above Below 10% 10% or Above Below 10% 10% or Above
All Students123621512253151223259
Female56695558126560111
Male670120667189663148
American Indian64120112
Asian183141812218020
Black64970126611
Hispanic717152701254744196
Native Hawaiian<<<<<<
White230332222617929
Two or more races353381411
Students with Disabilities125271254214045
Economically Disadvantaged780157773236763209
English Learners46992512195484156
Homeless1063894707651
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Standards of Accreditation (SOA) Offenses Data

2017-2018 Offenses
  Number of Offenses
Offenses Against Student <
Offenses Against Staff <
Weapons Offenses <
Property Offenses <
Other Offenses Against Persons 28
Disorderly or Disruptive Behavior Offenses 21
Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Offenses 28
Technology Offenses <
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Short Term Suspensions

Short Term Suspensions:

Increasingly, Virginia schools are implementing Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, a nationally-recognized approach to support positive academic and behavioral outcomes for students. This positive approach to discipline prepares teachers and principals to implement new techniques that reduce disruptive student behaviors that lead to suspensions and decrease instructional time.

A short-term suspension (10 days of less) may be imposed by a principal, an assistant principal, or a designee teacher in the principal’s absence. The principal or assistant principal must tell the student of the charges against him or her. If the student denies them, he or she is given an explanation of the facts as known to the school and an opportunity to present his version of what occurred. Notice to the parent may be oral or written, depending on local school board policy, and must include information on the length of the suspension, the availability of community-based educational options, and the student’s right to return to regular school attendance when the suspension period has expired.  A parent may ask for a short-term suspension decision to be reviewed by the superintendent or his designee. Local school board policy will determine whether the superintendent’s decision is final or can be appealed to the local school board. For more information, see A Parent’s Guide To Understanding Student Discipline Policies and Practices In Virginia Schools.

Short Term Suspensions
  2016-20172017-2018
Subgroup % Population% Short Term Suspensions% Population% Short Term Suspensions
American Indian1.0290.855
Asian13.0551.3713.158
Black5.14510.965.1327.14
Hispanic61.86576.7164.07969.64
Native Hawaiian0.0640.132
White16.33410.9613.88217.86
Two or more races2.5082.8295.36
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Long Term Suspensions

Long Term Supensions:

Increasingly, Virginia schools are implementing Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, a nationally-recognized approach to support positive academic and behavioral outcomes for students. This positive approach to discipline prepares teachers and principals to implement new techniques that reduce disruptive student behaviors that lead to suspensions and decrease instructional time.

A long-term suspension (more than 10 school days and less than 365 calendar days)  is usually imposed by a disciplinary hearing officer upon recommendation of a principal. The student must be told of the charges against him or her. If the student denies them, he or she is given an explanation of the facts as known to the school and an opportunity to present his or her version of what occurred. Notice to the parent (and child) must be in writing and must include information on the length of and reason for the suspension, the right to a hearing in accordance with local school board policy, the availability of community-based educational options, and the student’s right to return to regular school attendance when the suspension period has expired or to attend an appropriate alternative education program approved by the school board during the suspension or after the suspension period expires. Costs for any community-based educational programs or alternative programs that are not part of the program offered by the school division are the financial responsibility of the parent. A parent has the right to appeal a long-term suspension decision in accordance with local school board policy. The appeal may first go to the local superintendent or his or her designee or to a sub-committee of the local school board; final appeal is to the full school board. The appeal must be decided by the school board within 30 days. For more information, see A Parent’s Guide To Understanding Student Discipline Policies and Practices In Virginia Schools.

Long Term Suspensions
  2016-20172017-2018
Subgroup % Population% Long Term Suspensions% Population% Long Term Suspensions
American Indian1.0290.855
Asian13.05513.158
Black5.1455.132
Hispanic61.86564.079
Native Hawaiian0.0640.132
White16.33413.882
Two or more races2.5082.829
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Expulsions

Expulsions:

Increasingly, Virginia schools are implementing Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, a nationally-recognized approach to support positive academic and behavioral outcomes for students. This positive approach to discipline prepares teachers and principals to implement new techniques that reduce disruptive student behaviors that lead to suspensions and decrease instructional time.

An expulsion (removal from school for 365 calendar days) may only be imposed by a local school board. The student must be told of the charges against him or her. If the student denies them, he or she is given an explanation of the facts as known to the school and an opportunity to present his or her version of what occurred.  The parent (and child) must be noticed in writing of the proposed expulsion, the reasons the expulsion is being proposed, and of the right to a hearing before the school board or a sub-committee of the school board, depending on local policy. If the student is expelled, the parent is sent a written notification of the length of the expulsion and information on the availability of community-based educational, training, and intervention programs. The notice must state whether the student is eligible to return to regular school or to attend an approved alternative education program or an adult education program offered during or after the period of expulsion. The student may apply for readmission to be effective one calendar year from the date of his or her expulsion. For more information, see A Parent’s Guide To Understanding Student Discipline Policies and Practices In Virginia Schools.

Expulsions
  2016-20172017-2018
Subgroup % Population% Expulsions% Population% Expulsions
American Indian1.0290.855
Asian13.05513.158
Black5.1455.132
Hispanic61.86564.079
Native Hawaiian0.0640.132
White16.33413.882
Two or more races2.5082.829
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Free and Reduced Meal Eligibility

Free and Reduced Meal Eligibility:

School divisions that choose to take part in the National School Lunch Program get cash subsidies and donated commodities from the U.S. Department of Agriculture for each meal they serve. In return, they must serve lunches that meet Federal requirements, and they must offer free or reduced-price lunches to eligible children. The School Breakfast Program operates by supporting breakfasts in the same manner as the National School Lunch Program.

 

At the beginning of each school year, letters and meal applications are distributed to households of children attending school. This letter informs households that school nutrition programs are available and that free and reduced-price meals are available based on income criteria. Applications have been eliminated totally in divisions that implement the community eligibility provision for all schools within the division.

Children from families with incomes at or below 130 percent of the poverty level are eligible for free meals. Those between 130 percent and 185 percent of the poverty level are eligible for reduced-price meals, for which students can be charged no more than 40 cents for lunch and 30 cents for breakfast. All other students pay the full price for meals.

See the Virginia Department of Education website for more information about school nutrition programs.

Free and Reduced Meal Eligibility
  2014-20152015-20162016-2017
  PercentagePercentagePercentage
All Students 63.159.1560.79
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Free and Reduced Breakfast Participation of Eligible Students

Free and Reduced Breakfast Participation of Eligible Students :

The above pie graph displays the average daily percentage of students eligible for free or reduced-price meals who participated in the U.S. Department of Agriculture School Breakfast Program. The School Breakfast Program is a federally assisted meal program that provides nutritious breakfast meals to students. The Virginia Department of Education administers the program at the state level and school divisions administer the program at the local level.

Participation in the School Breakfast Program has been linked increased achievement, reduced absenteeism and tardiness, fewer disciplinary problems, and better student health.

Breakfast menus must provide one-fourth of the daily recommended levels for protein, calcium, iron, Vitamin A, Vitamin C and calories. Participating schools must serve breakfasts that meet Federal nutrition standards – one quarter of daily recommended levels of protein, calcium, iron, vitamins A and C and calories – and must provide free and reduced-price breakfasts to eligible children.

The No Kid Hungry Virginia campaign and the Virginia 365 Project are key state initiatives to increase participation in school nutrition programs and eliminate childhood hunger.

 

Free and Reduced Breakfast Participation
  2014-20152015-20162016-2017
  PercentagePercentagePercentage
All Students 39.9635.2931.23
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Free and Reduced Lunch Participation of Eligible Students

Free and Reduced Lunch Participation of Eligible Students:

The above pie graph displays the average daily percentage of students eligible for free or reduced-price meals who participated in the U.S. Department of Agriculture School Lunch Program.

School divisions that take part in the National School Lunch Program get cash subsidies and donated food items from the U.S. Department of Agriculture for each meal served. In return, schools must serve lunches that meet federal requirements, and must offer free or reduced-price lunches to eligible children.

Studies show that well-nourished students are better learners. The No Kid Hungry Virginia campaign and the Virginia 365 Project are key state initiatives to increase participation in school nutrition programs and eliminate childhood hunger.

 

Free and Reduced Lunch Participation
  2014-20152015-20162016-2017
  PercentagePercentagePercentage
All Students 78.6874.3371.76
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
Unduplicated = Students are able to be in two gap groups

Teacher Quality

Teacher Quality

Teacher Quality
Teachers Not Properly Licensed or Endorsed​ Provisionally Licensed Teachers​ Inexperienced Teachers​
Title I Not Title I Title I Not Title I Title I Not Title I
School
This School - - 7.2% - 3.6% -
Division
All Schools 0.6% 1.3% 9.4% 5.4% 7.1% 3.3%
High Poverty 0.8% - 9.3% - 6.1% -
Low Poverty - 1.2% - 5.6% - 3.2%
State
All Schools 1.6% 2.6% 7.1% 7% 6.4% 4.5%
High Poverty 2% 5.1% 8% 11.5% 7.4% 7.6%
Low Poverty 1.1% 1.6% 2.8% 5.7% 4.2% 3.6%
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available
This table reports the percentages of teachers at the school, division and state levels who are not properly licensed or endorsed for the content they are teaching, who are provisionally licensed, or who are inexperienced (less than one year of classroom experience). Percentages are reported for Title I schools, non-Title I schools, all schools and for high-poverty and low-poverty schools.

Provisionally Licensed Teachers

Provisionally Licensed Teachers
  2016-20172017-2018
Provisional Special Education0%1%
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available

This table reports the percentage of teachers teaching with provisional or provisional special education credentials.

This table provides data on the percentage of classes not taught by teachers meeting the federal definition of highly qualified.

Federal education law defines a highly qualified teacher as a teacher who is fully licensed by the state, has at least a bachelor’s degree, has demonstrated competency in each subject taught, and is teaching in his or her area of endorsement.

Virginia’s licensure regulations – which emphasize content knowledge as well as pedagogy – require new teachers to far exceed the federal highly qualified standard.

Teacher Educational Attainment

Teacher Educational Attainment: 2017-2018

The Virginia Department of Education reports annually on the percentage of teachers with bachelor’s, master’s, or doctorate degrees in schools, school divisions, and the state by highest degree earned.

Teacher Educational Attainment
  Bachelor's Degree Master's Degree Doctoral Degree Other
2015-201625%71%3%1%
2016-201727%71%1%1%
2017-201826%71%2%1%
LEGEND < = A group below state definition for personally identifiable results
- = No data for group
* = Data not yet available

Every Student Succeeds Act

ESSA Status: Not Identified for Support and Improvement
Accreditation Status: Accredited

ESSA School Quality Indicators Summary
Student GroupEnglish Reading PerformanceMathematics PerformanceEnglish Learner ProgressChronic AbsenteeismFederal Graduation Indicator
All StudentsYesYes-NoNo
AsianYesNo-NoYes
BlackYesYes-NoTS
HispanicYesYes-NoNo
WhiteYesYes-NoYes
Economically DisadvantagedYesYes-NoNo
English LearnersNoYesYesNoNo
Students with DisabilitiesNoNo-NoTS

Yes = Annual target met
No = Annual target not met
TS = Too few students to evaluate
— = Not applicable or no students

The Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 (ESSA) requires states to set annual and long-term targets for raising the achievement of all students. Virginia schools are focused on the following school quality indicators in meeting the objectives of the federal law:
  • Reading performance — percentage of students in the school passing state tests in reading
  • Mathematics performance — percentage of students in the school passing state tests in mathematics
  • Growth in reading and mathematics — percentage of students in the school either passing state tests in reading and mathematics or making significant progress toward passing
  • English learner progress — percentage of English learners making progress toward English-language proficiency
  • Chronic absenteeism — percentage of students missing 10 percent or more of the school year, regardless of reason (students receiving homebound and home-based instruction excluded)
  • Federal Graduation Indicator — percentage of students graduating within four years of entering the ninth grade with a Standard Diploma or Advanced Studies Diploma
More information about ESSA implementation in Virginia is available on the Virginia Department of Education website. Detailed state assessment results — including results by test type and student groups — are available on VDOE’s Test Results Build-A-Table data tool.
ESSA Annual Targets and Long-Term Goals: Reading
Student GroupCurrent RateThree-Year RateAnnual TargetLong Term Goal
All Students75%75%73%75%
Asian87%92%87%75%
Black84%78%60%75%
Hispanic67%66%63%75%
White83%89%81%75%
Economically Disadvantaged72%69%62%75%
English Learners48%46%53%75%
Students with Disabilities26%33%39%75%

< = Results suppressed to protect student privacy
— = Not applicable or no students

The Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 requires annual testing in reading in grades 3-8 and once during high school. Virginia’s ESSA implementation plan expects that by the 2023-2024 school year, at least 75 percent of all students, and of all students in the student groups listed in this table, will be able to demonstrate grade-level proficiency by passing state reading tests. Annual targets for student groups reflect improvement upon base-line performance from the 2015-2016 school year. Student groups meeting or exceeding annual or long-term targets must improve performance as compared to the previous year. Note: Reading pass rates reported for high schools reflect the performance of a 12th-grade class of students who entered the ninth grade at the same time.
ESSA Annual Targets and Long-Term Goals: Mathematics
Student GroupCurrent RateThree-Year RateAnnual TargetLong Term Goal
All Students83%82%74%70%
Asian85%88%89%70%
Black84%75%60%70%
Hispanic81%78%64%70%
White88%89%81%70%
Economically Disadvantaged83%79%63%70%
English Learners73%71%57%70%
Students with Disabilities41%35%42%70%

< = Results suppressed to protect student privacy
— = Not applicable or no students

The Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 requires annual testing in mathematics in grades 3-8 and once during high school. Virginia’s ESSA implementation plan expects that by the 2023-2024 school year, at least 70 percent of all students, and of all students in the student groups listed in this table, will be able to demonstrate grade-level proficiency by passing state mathematics tests. Annual targets for student groups reflect improvement upon base-line performance during the 2015-2016 school year. Student groups meeting or exceeding annual or long-term targets must improve performance compared to the previous year. Note: Mathematics pass rates reported for high schools reflect the performance of a 12th-grade class of students who entered the ninth grade at the same time on one of the following state tests: Algebra I, Geometry or Algebra II.
ESSA Pass Rates: Science
Student GroupCurrent Rate
All Students72%
Asian78%
Black84%
Hispanic67%
White78%
Economically Disadvantaged70%
English Learners49%
Students with Disabilities31%

< = Results suppressed to protect student privacy
— = Not applicable or no students

The Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 requires that students take state tests in science at least once during elementary school, once during middle school and once during high school. Note: Science pass rates reported for high schools reflect the performance on the state Biology test of a 12th-grade class of students who entered the ninth grade at the same time.
Federal Graduation Indicator
Student GroupCurrent RateAnnual TargetLong Term Goal
All Students71%84%84%
Asian98%90%84%
Black75%82%84%
Hispanic58%81%84%
White94%86%84%
Economically Disadvantaged64%78%84%
English Learners47%65%84%
Students with Disabilities71%56%84%
Homeless27%--
Foster Care---

< = Results suppressed to protect student privacy
— = Not applicable or no students

The Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 requires states to set annual and long-term targets for increasing the percentage of students who graduate with a Standard Diploma or Advanced Studies Diploma within four years of entering the ninth grade. Virginia’s ESSA implementation plan expects that by the 2023-2024 school year, at least 84 percent of all students, and of students in the student groups listed in this table, will earn a Standard Diploma or an Advanced Studies Diploma within four years. Annual targets for student groups reflect improvement upon base-line performance from the 2015-2016 school year. Student groups meeting or exceeding annual or long-term targets must improve performance compared to previous year.
Chronic Absenteeism
Student GroupCurrent RateThree-Year RateAnnual TargetLong Term Goal
All Students17%18%9%10%
Asian10%9%5%10%
Black14%14%9%10%
Hispanic21%22%9%10%
White14%12%9%10%
Economically Disadvantaged22%21%13%10%
English Learners24%23%8%10%
Students with Disabilities24%23%14%10%

< = Results suppressed to protect student privacy
— = Not applicable or no students

Daily attendance is critical to success in school. A student is considered chronically absent if he or she is absent for 10 percent or more of the school year, regardless of whether the absences are excused or unexcused. According to the U.S. Department of Education:
  • Children who are chronically absent in preschool, kindergarten, and first grade are much less likely to read on grade level by the third grade.
  • Students who can't read at grade level by the third grade are four times more likely to drop out of high school.
  • By high school, regular attendance is a better dropout indicator than test scores.
  • A student who is chronically absent in any year between the eighth and twelfth grade is seven times more likely to drop out of school.
The calculation for chronic absenteeism only includes students enrolled for at least half of the school year. The Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 requires states to set annual and long-term targets for reducing chronic absenteeism. Virginia’s ESSA implementation plan expects that by the 2023-2024 school year, no more than 10 percent of all students, and of students in the student groups listed in this table, will be chronically absent. Annual targets for student groups reflect improvement upon base-line data from the 2015-2016 school year. Student groups meeting or exceeding annual or long-term targets for reducing chronic absenteeism must improve performance compared to the previous year.
English Learner Progress and Proficiency
English LearnersPercentAnnual TargetLong Term Goal
English Learner Progress61%46%58%
English Learner Proficiency12%--
< = Results suppressed to protect student privacy
— = Not applicable or no students
The Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 requires states to set annual targets and long-term goals for increasing the percentage of English learners making progress toward attaining English-language proficiency. Virginia also reports on the percentage of English learners who attain proficiency.
English LearnersNumeratorDenominatorRate
English Learner Progress22537161%
English Learner Proficiency5043312%
ESSA Participation Rates
Student GroupEnglish Reading ParticipationMathematics ParticipationScience Participation
All Students88%97%95%
Asian93%89%91%
Black100%100%100%
Hispanic82%98%95%
White95%95%95%
Economically Disadvantaged85%98%95%
Not Economically Disadvantaged91%94%95%
English Learners73%96%92%
Students with Disabilities80%94%100%
Students without Disabilities88%97%95%
Female90%97%97%
Male85%96%94%
Migrant---

< = Results suppressed to protect student privacy
— = Not applicable or no students

The Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 requires states to assess at least 95 percent of students in reading and mathematics in grades 3-8, and to test at least 95 percent of students in reading and mathematics at least once during their high school careers. States also report on the percentage of students assessed in science in elementary school, middle school and in high school (Biology).
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